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COVID vaccine injuries rise as experts raise concerns

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Latest statistics released by the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that a total of 1,357,940 reports of adverse events following COVID-19 vaccines were submitted between Dec. 14, 2020, and July 22, 2022, to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).

That’s an increase of 6,990 adverse events over the previous week.

The data included a total of 29,790 reports of deaths — an increase of 155 over the previous week — and 247,686 serious injuries, including deaths, during the same time period — up 1,010 compared with the previous week.

Of the 29,790 reported deaths, 19,236 cases are attributed to Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine, 7,917 cases to Moderna, 2,584 cases to Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and no cases yet reported for Novavax.

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Excluding “foreign reports” to VAERS, 848,094 adverse events, including 13,805 deaths and 86,604 serious injuries, were reported in the U.S. between Dec. 14, 2020, and July 22, 2022.

Of the 13,805 U.S. deaths reported as of July 22, 7% occurred within 24 hours of vaccination, 15% occurred within 48 hours of vaccination and 54% occurred in people who experienced an onset of symptoms within 48 hours of being vaccinated.

In the U.S., 601 million COVID-19 vaccine doses had been administered as of July 20, including 355 million doses of Pfizer, 227 million doses of Moderna and 19 million doses of Johnson & Johnson (J&J).

According to a case study published July 18 in Nephron, a previously healthy 47-year-old woman presented to a primary care clinic for bilateral flank pain, generalized weakness and bilateral lower extremity swelling that started three days after her first Pfizer shot.

“Rarely, autoimmune processes have been described post-vaccination. AAV is an example of an autoimmune disease that can be induced or flared up from a silent state by COVID-19 vaccines,” the authors concluded. “A high index of suspicion regarding the presence of an autoimmune renal process is needed whenever a recently COVID-19-vaccinated individual presents for acute kidney injury.”

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According to survey results released Tuesday, 43% of U.S. parents of children under 5 will “definitely not” give their child a COVID-19 vaccine amid concerns the vaccine poses a greater risk to kids than the virus.

Even parents who were vaccinated against COVID-19 said they would not give permission for their youngest children to get vaccinated.

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When asked why they will not vaccinate their eligible child under 5 “right away,” parents cited “concerns about the newness of the vaccine and not enough testing or research, concerns over side effects and worries over the overall safety of the vaccines.”

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